Various types of ISO Standards

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What are the various types of ISO Standards?

ISO

ISO 9355-1:1999 Ergonomic requirements for the design of displays and control actuators – Part 1: Human interactions with displays and control actuators.

This International Standards applies to the design of displays and control actuators on machinery. It specifics general principles for human interaction with displays and control actuators, to minimize operator errors and to ensure an efficient interaction between the operator and the equipment. It is particularly important to observe these principles when an operator error may lead to injury or damage to health.

ISO 9355-2:1999 Ergonomic requirements for the design of displays and control actuators – Part 2: Displays.

This International Standards gives guidance on the selection, design and location of displays to avoid potential ergonomic hazards associated with their use.It specifies ergonomics requirements and covers visual, audible and tactile displays, and applies to displays used in machinery (e.g. devices and installations, control panels, operating and monitoring consoles) for occupational and private use.

ISO 11553:1996 – Laser processing machines – Safety Safety of machinery requirements.

This International Standard describes hazards generated by laser processing machines and specifies safety requirements relating to radiation hazards and hazards generated by materials and substances. It also specifies information to be supplied by manufacturers of such equipment. Not applicable to laser products or equipment manufactured solely for photo lithography, stereo lithography, holography, medical applications or data storage.

ISO/TR 11688-1:1995Acoustics-Recommended practices for the design of low- noise machinery and equipment – Part 1: Planning.

This International Technical Report is an (lid to understanding the basic concepts of noise control in machinery and equipment. The practice presented is intended to assist designers at any design stage to control the noise of the final product. Reference is made to numerous technical publications dealing with acoustical problems.

ISO/TR 11688-2:1998 Acoustics – Recommended practice for the design of low- noise machinery and equipment – Part 2. Introduction to the physics of low-noise design.

This Technical Report provides the physical background for the low-noise design rules. It is intended for use by designers of machinery and equipment as well as users and/or buyers of machines and authorities in the field of legislation, supervision or inspection. Equations given herein will improve the general understanding of noise control. In many cases they allow a comparison of different versions of design, but are not useful for the prediction of absolute noise emission values.

ISO 12100-1:2003 safely 9f machinery – Basic concepts, general principles for design – Part 1: Basic terminology, methodology.

This International Standard defines basic terminology and methodology used in achieving safety of machinery. The provision stated herein are intended for the designer. It does not deal with damage to domestic animals, property or the environment.

ISO 12100-2:2003 Safety of machinery – Basic concepts, general principles for design – Part 2: Technical principles.

This International Standard defines technical principles to help designers in achieving safety in the design of machinery. It is intender to be used together with ISO 12100-1 when considering the solution to a specific problem. The two parts of ISO 12100 can be used independently of other documents o as a basis for the preparation of other type-A standards or type-B or C standards. This standard does not deal with damage to domestic animals, property or the environment

ISO 12648:2003 Graphic technology Safety requirements for printing press systems.

This International Standard applies to printing press system, including auxiliary equipment and finishing machines, in which all the machine actuators (e o drives) of the equipment in the system are controlled by the same control system, applies only to systems in which a printing press is part of the system. It addresses recognized hazards specific to printing press systems in the following areas mechanical; electrical; slipping, tripping, falling; ergonomics; noise; radiation; fire and explosion; thermal; and emissions. It applies to new machines manufactured after December 31 of the year following the year of publication.

ISO/TS 13732-2:2001 Ergonomics of the thermal environment – Methods for the assessment of human responses to contact with surfaces – Part 2: Human contact with surface at moderate temperature.

This part of ISO/TS 13732 presents principles and methods for predicting thermal sensation and degree of discomfort in cases where parts of the body contact solid surfaces at moderate temperatures. Also deals with thermal sensation for contacts of hands, feet and for sitting position on the floor.

ISO 13849-1:1999 Safety of machinery- Safety-related parts of control. Systems- Part 2: Validation.

This International Standard specifies the procedures and conditions to be followed for the validation by analysis and testing of the safety functions provided and the category achieved for the safety-related parts of the control system in compliance with EN 954-1 (150 13849-1), using the design rationale provided by the designer. This International Standard does not give complete validation requirements for programmable electronic systems and therefore can require the use of other standards.

ISO/TR 13849-100:2000 safely of machinery – Safety-related parts of control systems – Part 100: Guidelines for the use and application of ISO 13849-1.

This Technical Report provides guidance on the appropriate use and interpretation of ISO 13849-1:1999. It also gives further information on how the control system contributes to reducing risk in the machine; what is meant by the safety-related parts of the control system in relation to safety functions; the proper selection and use of categories; and the role of annex. B of ISO 13849-1:1999.

ISO 13850:1996 Safety of machinery – Emergency stop- Principles for design.

This International Standard specifies functional requirements and design principles for the emergency stop of machinery; independent of the type of energy used to control the function. This International Standard does not deal with functions such as reversal 0 limitation of motion, deflection, shielding, braking, or disconnecting, which may be pan of the emergency stop function.

ISO 13851:2002 Safety of machinery – Two-hand control device -Functional aspects and design principles.

This International Standard specifies the safety requirements of a two-hand control device and the dependency of the output signal from the input signals. It describes the main characteristics of two-hand control devices for the achievement of safety. And sets out combinations of functional characteristics for three types. It provides requirements and guidance on the design and selection of two- hand control devices including their assessment; the prevention of defeat and the avoidance of faults It also provides requirements and guidance for two-hand control devices containing a programmable electronic system.

ISO 13852:1996Safety of machinery – Safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the upper limbs.

This International Standard establishes values for safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the upper limbs of persons of 3 years of age and above. Distances apply when adequate safety can be achieved by distances alone.

ISO 13853:1998Safety of machinery – Safety distances to prevent danger zones being reached by the lower limbs.

This International Standard establishes values for safety distances to prevent access and distances to impede free access to machinery danger zones to prevent their being reached by the lower limbs of persons 14 years of age and above.

ISO 13854:1996 Safety of machinery – Minimum gaps to avoid crushing of parts of the human body.

The object of this International Standard is to enable the user (e.g. standard makers, designers of machinery) to avoid hazards form crushing zones. It specifies minimum gaps relative to parts of the human body and is applicable when adequate safety can be achieved by this method.

ISO 13855:2002 Safety of machinery. – Positioning of protective equipment with respect to the approach speeds of parts of the human body.

This International Standard provides parameters based on values for hand/arm and approach speeds and the methodology to determine the minimum distances form sensing or actuating devices of protective equipment to a danger zone. It does not apply to protective equipment which is intended to be moved, without tools, nearer to the danger zone than the calculated distance, e.g. pendant two-hand control devices.

ISO 13856-1:2001 Safety of machinery. – Pressure-sensitive protective devices – Part 1: General principles for design and testing of pressure- sensitive mats and pressure-sensitive floors.

This international standard specifies requirements for pressure-sensitive mats and floors normally actuated by the feet, for use as safety devices to protect persons from dangerous machinery. The minimum safety requirements for the performance, marking and documentation are given. It deals with pressure-sensitive mats and floors, regardless of type of energy used, designed to detect persons weighing more than 35 kg and persons weighing more than 20 kg.

ISO 14118:2000 Safety of machinery – Prevention of unexpected start-up.

This International Standard specifies built-in safety measures aimed at preventing unexpected machine start-up to allow safe human interventions in hazard zones.

ISO 14119:1998 Safety of machinery. – Interlocking devices associated with guards – Principles for design and selection.

This International Standard specifies principles for the design and selection, independent of the nature of the energy source, of interlocking devices associated with guards.

ISO 14120:2002 Safety of machinery. – Guards – General requirements for the design and construction of fixed and movable guards.

This International Standard Specifies general requirements for the design and construction of guards provided primarily to protect persons form mechanical hazards. It applies primarily to machines which will be manufactured after it is published. The requirements tire applicable if fixed and movable guards are used, but does not cover guards which actuate interlocking devices. It does not provide requirement for special systems relating specifically to mobility or to the ability to lift loads.

ISO 14121:1999 Safety of machinery – Principles of risk assessment.

This International Standard establishes general principles for the procedure known as risk assessment, by which the knowledge and experience of the design, use, incidents accidents and harm related to machinery is brought together in order to assess the risks during all phases of the life of the machinery. This International Standard gives guidance on the information required to allow risk assessment to be carried out. Procedures are described for identifying hazards and estimating and evaluating risk. This International Standard is not intended to provide a detailed account of methods for analyzing hazards and estimating risk; as this is dealt with elsewhere (e.g. text books and other reference documents).

ISO 14122-1:2001 Safety of machinery. – Permanent means of access to machinery – Part 1: Choice of fixed means of access between two levels.

This International Standard applies to all machinery (stationary and mobile) where fixed means of access are necessary. It advises on the correct choice of access means when the necessary access to the machine is not possible directly from the ground level or from a floor; Applies to access means which are a part of a machine; means of access specific to the machine which are not permanently fixed to the machine; and may apply to means of access which are part of the building. Not applicable to devices specifically designed to lift persons between two levels.

ISO 14122-2:2001 Safety of machinery – Permanent means of access to machinery – Part 2: Working platforms and walkways.

This International Standard applies to all machinery (stationary and mobile) where fixed means of access are necessary. It applies to working platforms and walkways which arc a part of a machine; arc specific to the machine which are not permanently fixed to the machine; working platforms and walkways to part of the building where the machine is installed. Not applicable to devices specifically designed to lift persons between two levels.

ISO 14122-3:2001 Safety of machinery – Permanent means of access to machinery – part 3: Stairs, stepladders and guard-rails.

This International Standard applies to all machinery (stationary and mobile) where fixed means of access are necessary. Applies to stairs, step ladders and guard-rails which are part of machine; arc specific to the machine which are not permanently fixed to the machine; and may apply to stairs, stepladders and guard-rails to part of the building where the machine is installed.

ISO 14123-1:1998 Safety of machinery Reduction of risks to health form hazardous substances emitted by machinery specifications for machinery manufacturers.

This part of ISO 14123 deals with principles for the control of risks to health due to hazardous substances from machinery. This part of ISO 14123 is not applicable to substances which are a hazard to health solely. Because of their explosive, flammable or radio active properties or their behavior at extremes of temperature or pressure.

ISO 14123-2:1998 Safety of machinery hazardous substances emitted by machinery. – Part 2: Methodology leading to verification procedures.

This of ISO 14123 defines a procedure which leads to the selection of critical factors; relating to emissions of hazardous substances for the purpose of specifying suitable verification procedures. This part of ISO 14123 intended to used in conjunction with ISO 14123-1; and relates specifically to clause 8 Reduction of risks to health form of that standard.

ISO 15534-1:2000 Ergonomic design for the safety of machinery. Part 1: Principles for determining the dimensions required for openings for whole-body access into machinery.

This part of ISO 15534 specifies the dimensions of openings for whole-body access into machinery as defined in ISO/TR 12100-1. It provides the dimensions to which the values given in ISO 15534-3are applicable. It has prepared primarily for non mobile machinery; there may be additional specific requirements for mobile machinery. This part of ISO 15534 shows how to combine the anthropometric data with suitable allowances to take these factors into account. Situations where people prevented from reaching a hazard dealt with in ISO 13852.

ISO 15534-2:2000 Ergonomic design for the safety of machinery – Part 2: Principles for determining the dimensions required for access openings.

This part of ISO 15534specifies the dimensions of openings for access into machinery as defined in ISO/TR 12100-1. It provides the dimensions to which the values given in ISO15534- 3are applicable. It has prepared primarily for non-mobile machinery; there may be additional specific requirements for mobile machinery. This part of ISO 15534shows how to combine the anthropometric data with suitable allowances to take these factors into account. Situations where people prevented from reaching a hazard dealt with in ISO 13852.

ISO 15534-3:2000 Ergonomic design for the safety of machinery – Part 3: Anthropometric data.

This part of ISO 15534 specifies current requirements for human body measurements (anthropometric data). Required by ISO 15534-1and ISO 15534-2 for the calculation of access-opening dimensions as applied to machinery. The data are based on information from anthropometric surveys representative of population groups within Europe comprising at least three million people; both men and women. Measurements meet the requirements of ISO 15534-1 and ISO 15534-2.

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